Posts Tagged 'Frank Lloyd Wright'

A Day at the Museum

temple of dendur

Temple of Dendur

Oh wow, you do NOT want to be wandering around NYC in August when the temps are in the 90s and the real-feel is in the high 90s. But that’s where you could find me yesterday. My cousin was in town for a few days and I went in to the city to meet her. She was traveling with a friend who’d never been to NYC. Normally I’d say let’s cram in everything we can but I knew the heat and humidity would knock us out. We agreed to go to a museum (air-conditioned) and then we’d go stand in the line at the TKTS booth and see what else we’d do. I wasn’t planning to stay in the city for an evening show, but hanging out at Times Square in line can be its own amusement. It’s a great place for people watching. My goal was to see my cousin Robin so I didn’t really mind what we did as long as I was not pounding the pavement all day.
mounted knights in armor

We agreed to meet up at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. I always say I don’t like museums but I’m realizing that is not true. I do like museums. What I don’t like is having to look at paintings. When my son and I were in Venice in the Doge’s Palace, I finally cracked and told him we had to leave. I simply could not look at one more painting of a duke riding out to greet a pope. As long as we could look at architecture and artifacts I was fine, but the endless paintings broke me. I don’t spend much time staring at artifacts, either, and only read the placards if the item is unusually interesting. I’m sure there are those who would call me ‘heathen’ and they are probably correct. 🙂

Trumpet call harmonica

Trumpet Call Diatonic Harmonica in G, catalog #504471, ca 1915

I was able to catch a train around 9:00 am, which got me into the city around 10. I’d normally have walked from my house to the station, about a mile, but I had a late start. I had already decided I should drive because I had no idea how much walking I’d be doing and I figured I might need to conserve all that foot and leg energy for later. My cousin and I texted while I was on the train. They were walking to the museum. *smile* I usually walk about midtown when I’m there. First, it’s very expensive to take a taxi. I have no problem with the subway but it doesn’t always go where I want to go. In fact, walking is often the fastest way to get anywhere, assuming you are not traveling great distances. I have no problem with walking 40 blocks or so as long as I’ve got the correct footwear. I don’t think, however, that they had grasped exactly what it is like to walk over 40 blocks in NYC (I believe they started over on Lex and 49th).

nagphani horn

Nagphani, India Late 19th Century, catalog #500781

Robin and her friend were thinking of having breakfast someplace and then going to the museum. Based on their progress at the point when my train got in, I figured I’d meet them up at the museum. Penn Station is at 33rd and 7th, the museum is at 83rd and 5th. That is about 3.5 miles. I decided to break with family tradition and take a taxi. My mother NEVER took taxis. When she and her friends got up in years, she was always offended when they’d insist on taking a taxi. I don’t think my mother even took the subway much. She WALKED. I could imagine her scorn at my indulgence, but at that point it really seemed the fastest and coolest way to get uptown. Even if I took the subway I’d end up walking across the park to get from the Museum of Natural History to the Met.

whistling jar

Whistling Jar, Chimu culture, Peru, 1000-1476, catalog #501305

I got in the taxi and asked him to take me to Madison and 82, figuring that Robin would be breakfasting somewhere near the museum and I wouldn’t have to wait for the taxi to make the 2 left turns to get to the museum. That bit about the left turns might sound odd to those of you who have never traveled in the city, but trust me – when the cross town streets get crowded, trying to get around a block can take a significant amount of time. While we were still heading uptown on Madison, Robin told me that they’d gone into the museum. At that point I told the driver to take me there directly.

grogger (cog rattle)

THEY call it a Cog rattle; WE call it a grogger. 15/16th century. #503725

There was no line to get in yet so I cruised in and met up with Robin and Kevin. I’d enjoyed getting a half-price rail fare because I’m a member of AARP (thanks to my husband, who signed me up WAY earlier than I could have joined on my own *grin*). There is no AARP discount at the museum nor was there any reciprocity with my membership in the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. Full price time. Neither Kevin nor I had had any breakfast at all so we headed straight for the American Wing Cafe for coffee. Ahhhh. I needed that. 🙂
The Astor Court

We decided to wander about instead of taking an introductory tour. The American Cafe is directly behind the Temple of Dendur, which is a “must see” if you are at the museum. We started there. Next we headed to the Arms and Armour exhibit. I’d actually been to both places only 18 months earlier, when my husband and I had been in the city for the day and dinner, but they are both well worth multiple visits. I wanted to show them the Astor Chinese Garden Court. Although we had maps, parts of the museum were under renovation, so we kept getting directions to the elevator to get to the Asian Art exhibits. I kept insisting we could walk, so we ended up wandering through other exhibits as we attempted to get there.

japanese striped bowl

Neriage marbleized stoneware, Japan

I’d never been to the musical instrument exhibit before (galleries 680-684). Having just toured the Musical Instrument Museum in Phoenix 2 months earlier, I found the instruments more interesting and intriguing than I might have in the past. There are so many different ways that people make music. The materials and the shapes and the combinations – absolutely fascinating. If you look at the map (the link above) it APPEARS that you can walk from the musical instruments area to the Asian Art wing. Appearances can deceive. I finally gave up and we took the elevator to the Asian Art.

glass deer

PixCell (Glass bead) deer, Japan, catalog #76970

We must have gone up only a 1/2 floor. We barely moved, and then the doors on the other side of the elevator opened and we were in Asian Art. As we stepped out we saw/heard a tour in progress. The docent was describing the glass deer (well, that’s MY term for it) by Kohei Nawa. I’d seen this deer last trip as well. It is a taxidermied deer, covered with glass balls of varying sizes. I find it both attractive and a tad repugnant (because it seems disrespectful of the dead deer).

koi pond

Koi pond in Astor Court

But at last we found the Astor Court. I LOVE this spot. I know that there are no chairs there/places to sit, because if there WERE, the place would be packed with folks sitting there in serenity. My memory told me that when I was there in January, there had been flowering plants. There were none there at the moment, but when I checked my photos I saw that for once my memory was right on target (unlike my memory of walking to the Astor Court *grin*). We all loved the garden and spent a little time there simply enjoying it, and watching the koi.

FLW fabric boucle damask

FLW fabric boucle damask

We wandered through the Asian Art exhibit. We had one last “planned” stop in the museum – Schumacher’s Taliesin Line of Decorative Fabrics and Wallpapers Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright,1955 (gallery 599). We found our way there (by this time I asked for directions every time I saw a museum worker). I’m not sure what I was expecting, but I was expecting MORE than what was there. It’s a very, very small room – about the size of my son’s bedroom. Even so, there were FLW patterns, so we had the FLW experience.

flw fabric damask

FLW fabric damask


We made sure to wander through the Gift Shop on our way out, but we all nobly restrained ourselves from buying anything (and we each had things in our hands at one point so you know it was difficult).
flw fabric

FLW fabric

Next on the agenda was heading back to midtown to wait in the TKTS line so Robin and Kevin could get show tickets. It was 2:30, and it was hot and humid. *smile* We all opted for a taxi back down to Times Square. Ahhhh. Air conditioned. No walking. We got there about 10 minutes before the booth opened. It’s become so efficient and modern since I last stood in the TKTS line. In MY day, sonny, they only took cash at the window. You didn’t know what was available til you got to the counter and could peer behind the agents. Now everything is computerized, there are sign boards out front, they take credit cards. 🙂 Ahhh, technology. While Kevin and Robin waited in line, I sat on the big red bleachers and watched the people. They joined me, waving their prize – tickets to Tootsie!!!
Book Our Shoes Our Selves

I decided that they NEEDED to see Rockefeller Center (I have a sentimental attachment as I used to work at 30 Rock, back in the days when it was the RCA Building). We walked over there and took photos. I had NO IDEA that in the summer they put in a SANDBOX in the middle of the promenade! You know I went straight over and sat down in a chair and wriggled my toes in the sand! From there we headed over to The Playwright, a restaurant on 49th. As it happens, I have fond memories of this restaurant as well, as my son and I had dinner here one day when we were doing a day of TKTS – matinee in the afternoon, show in the evening. 🙂 We hung out drinking and eating and chatting for about 2 hours. Then I headed for the train home and they headed to the theater. All in all, a lovely day in the city, despite the heat and humidity.

times Square

Times Square as seen from the big red bleachers

Taliesin West

Trivets available for sale

Trivets for sale

I have nothing I can say about this experience except that I LOVE LOVE LOVE Frank Lloyd Wright’s work. Everything we saw at Taliesin West was fascinating, engaging and desirable. The absolute genius of the man takes your breath away. It must have been close to unbearable at times to live with him or interact with him, but his work makes heaven on earth.

Walk from parking lot at TW

Walking from the parking lot

I loved the tour so much that I signed up to become a member of the FLW organization, I bought gifts for every member of my family, and I ordered a wall hanging for my house. If I could have bought every single item in the gift shop I would have. This has strengthened my resolve to get to Falling Water this year before it is too late for either me or it. 🙂

Entrance to Taliesin West

View from the entry area, looking down towards the triangular pool (out of sight, all the way at the end on the left)

The pictures here are in the order of the tour. We started in the gift shop (it was air conditioned) and then moved past the large triangular swimming pool to look out on the once-unbroken vista, then to the entry courtyard for the living quarters.

Petroglyph at TW

Petroglyph in entry area

We saw the living room, the family courtyard, FLW’s study, the indoor meeting room/movie theater, the first stage theater they built, and then the second, larger theater/stage area. We could look into the communal eating area but we did not enter there or into the working studio, although we could look in somewhat through the windows as we walked by.

View from Taliesin West

Vista from the triangle pool.

Sculpture in courtyard at TW

Sculpture in entry courtyard to living areas. Notice the workman on roof. That and the pool are undergoing extensive repairs.

Entrance Courtyard at TW

Outside wall of the living room. Doorway is out of sight on the left. Can’t look in the windows.

Doorway into living quarters

Doorway into the living areas. Yes, the buildings really are that low. FLW was not tall. 🙂

Living Room at TW

The living area. Everywhere is comfortable. Everywhere has a view. The windows allow you to look out but prevent those outside from looking in.

Table and chairs in living room

Table and chairs in the living room.

View from living room to family courtyard

Looking out from the living room to the family courtyard with the moongate in the wall. Piano in the foreground. The armrests are designed to fit an adult in a resting position.

Family courtyard with view into living room

Family courtyard looking in to the living room. Looking in by the family/those inside the house is ‘okay’. Otherwise windows are situated to give privacy from ‘outside’.

Family courtyard with moongate

Family courtyard with moongate that leads to the private family rooms.

About this point in time I began to give up on trying to take photos. 🙂 It was ALL so magnificent and I wanted to remember EVERYTHING. I knew that none of my pictures were doing justice to what I saw. Even with that resolution, I kept taking pictures anyway.

Small pool at TW

Small pool between the living quarters and the meeting room, which also was the movie room. None of my photos could do justice to the recessed lighting and other forward-thinking amenities there.

View out to the mountains from a walkway

View walking from the meeting room to the first theater building.

Dragon Sculpture that breathes fire

I believe this dragon sculpture is designed to breathe fire. FLW did not miss a trick.

We learned so much about the man, the work, this location. I contemplated trying to put some of that in this post and realized I’d be writing for ‘pages’ and I’d undoubtedly get it wrong. If you can get there or to any other of the FLW organization sites, take a tour. There are so many features tucked away that you might not notice on your own. FLW had recessed lighting and lighting in the floor and so many other features that we think only came about recently.

Walk to movie theater

Aisle walking to the theater, which is carved out of the rock

Movie theater with perfect acoustics

Inside the theater. The Panel on the side of the theater was for showing the director’s cut of the movie, which is larger than the commercial version. The theater has perfect acoustics. There is a piano in that cutout in the wall on the right – you can hear every note perfectly despite it being in the wall.

Courtyard before new theater building

Courtyard in front of the second, larger theater.

Goodbye to Falling Water

This week the blogs and tweets and plurks were buzzing. The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation withdrew its license to the Virtual Frank Lloyd Wright Museum in Second Life. This is the kind of news that makes me very sad. When I talk about fighting the darkness, the darkness includes such dispiriting news. I will concede that there could be all sorts of issues involved of which I am unaware. But as a simple resident of SL, as a person who enjoys creativity, art, architecture, loves many of Frank Lloyd Wright’s creations, well, I just don’t see why this has to be. There was a tribute to Frank Lloyd Wright in SL. It seemed back in September 2010 that the RL FLW organization had recognized and welcomed this tribute. But come December apparently there was a change of heart. And in the now-famous tradition of this century, a cease-and-desist order has come through to shut down what was intended as a joyous celebration, not an intrusion or rip-off. Sigh. There is only one week left to see the FLW sim. I urge you to do so.

Many people have blogged this far better than I. I refer you to two blogs in particular, which both have other links. Betterverse, a blog devoted to non-profits in virtual worlds has a very good write-up. ArchVirtual, a blog for Architecture and Design in Virtual Worlds has a very heartfelt post by Jon Brouchoud as well as links to many other reactions to this forced closing. And of course Honour McMillan has some lovely photos of the SL site.

Oura and I spent a lovely evening at Falling Water back in the summer of 2009. My pictures do not do it justice, so I urge you to get there yourself before Dec 10, 2010.
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Last night was the farewell ball at the Virtual Museum. It was EXTREMELY crowded and very laggy. Not exactly a surprise. For the first time ever, I crashed when I attempted to take a photo. So I switched machines, lowered the photo quality and tried to not focus on gray semi-shapeless forms. Go see the museum for yourself, while there is still this one week left to enjoy it.


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